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mullachbuie
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The World is best viewed through the ears of a horse.


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xx Back to Highlands
« Thread started on: Mar 16th, 2013, 10:44pm »

Well, that didn't last long! undecided
My sharer for big Milly found that poo picking in the winter wasn't the fun it was meant to be....... huh
and has pulled out of the share. So Milly has gone back to her owner and now been sold. So, I'm sticking to Highlands - sorry Charlie!!
Fraser is the boy I'm planning to do all my stuff with, and the one I will bring to the camp. He is 14.2hh, 5 yrs old, and a really steady chap. He's not very bendy yet, and I am just about to start the NH stuff with him.
He is really willing and eager to please, I am very excited about this partnership.
He was also broken to drive before I got him, and I enjoy working my ponies in the woods, so Fraser has his harness fitted and will start pulling firewood out of the woods. We are just consolidating the voice commands.
So, we'll be making the journey to Cornborough in August: I just need a booking form, and we're set. smiley

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« Last Edit: Mar 16th, 2013, 10:46pm by mullachbuie » User IP Logged

Liz
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xx Re: Back to Highlands
« Reply #1 on: Mar 22nd, 2013, 4:41pm »

Shame about your sharer - the rose-tinted specs didn't last long when confronted with reality then?! Sorry you haven't received a summer camp booking form - I sent it out to you in early February and again this week if you still don't have it please contact me directly in case the email address I have is incorrect.
Well done Alex in finding a new home for Tilly - has she gone to a showing or hacking home do you know?
How fascinating that all the horses have picked up on your semi-frozen (would that make it 'chilled'?) shoulder: keep up with the loosening exercises. How are the cows and calves - any new arrivals lately?
What's Vanessa up to and her Little Monster? I hope all is well with him and the family.
Things go on as usual with us - Claude is really getting into his stride with moulting now and I use both the Furminator and a long, metal toothed, scraper thing (don't know its real name) and yesterday I scraped and scraped and scraped and ended up with his hair almost reaching the tops of my wellies! That is serious moulting. On the other hand, Nins grudgingly parted with a couple of dozen hairs - is that her being sensible and aware of the cold snap arriving or her Cushings kicking in - I wonder? Milo didn't bother to grow a winter coat but he is losing a small amount - I think they look at Claude's loss and shiver!

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Judith
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xx Re: Back to Highlands
« Reply #2 on: Mar 25th, 2013, 7:54pm »

Best laid plans! What a shame you ve been let down.
With this winter its hardly suprising that the sharer pulled out - it feels it ll never end! Fraser looks a great sort though, and I m sure you and he will enjoy N H together.
We ve had no snow here , but the wind is 'wuthering' , absolutely freezing. C and Tessa rode out today. Even the horse s want to be inside , and are ready to come back in after a couple of hours. C did a competition last Weds , won the Elementary, and a close 3rd in Medium , with 64. something %. C at last feels Wills can do the movements with understanding , rather than getting tense.
Suprisingly, C is still teaching - often outside , or at best indoors with wide going straight through both ends of a foldyard. We are still looking for the dressage youngster - a 'maybe' has appeared . At a 1yr old he s alittle young , and we ll need a longish trip nto the Borders to check him out .
MY shoulder at times seems better - until I have to move it to its full range of movement, , where it says 'no' quite seriously. However , I push it to the limit and keep repeating the movement. I think Im therefore stopping the adhesions sticking fast , but Ill be able to say in a few weeks time whether or not I m doing the correct thing. I m tryinjg to prevent this right arm doing a freeze as the left arm did last spring/summer. The exercises Im doing now are preferable to exercises post op, so in the spirit of prevention being better than cure , I carry on!

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Judith
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xx Re: Back to Highlands
« Reply #3 on: Apr 8th, 2013, 5:49pm »

I hope everyone been doing more riding than I have!
We have so little grass Ben and Topper hate going outside, and call to come back in. So we are still on ful winter regime - and shall be for some weeks yet.
Charlie has managed to school Wills sometimes [ outdoor school at a students home - cold north winds ripping over the hill!], and did a competition yesterday- winning Elem clas and second in medium. But scores not wills s best - he hasnt been out for a few weeks , so needs more match practise to get back in the swing of it.
The search goes on for a youngster. one in Hawick was sold before we got there [ so it was probably a good un!] , and tried today at a 4 yr old, in lincs. This gelding was nearly right, certainly strong enough ,nice person ,good height,etc, but just hadnt the dressage movement through the shoulders and forelimbs, or to compensate good enough conformation to show well. So if anyone wants a good coloured potential showjumper , this one would do that job.Did I say we were picky?!
I have done nearly all the rolling , except for the part of the field thats been underwater since last summer. The water there is about 4" lower , but still a pond. No grass is growing. I ve sold 6 of my 'birds' the heifers I d got 16 months ago. They went as abatch to a local farmer , so have a good home. There just isnt the space and haylage to keep them all.
All cows due to calve this spring have delivered. One of my eldest , 18 yrs old , slipped another foetus we think, and we assume she did the same last September. In her life shes had 4 breach births , and 2 yrs where she didnt calve at all, so not straightforward. My other 18 yr old has had 18 calves, all fine , inc 2 sts of twins, and deserves a medal!
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Liz
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xx Re: Back to Highlands
« Reply #4 on: Apr 12th, 2013, 12:37pm »

More rain today and yesterday the weatherman said 'good news for farmers and growers with some rain for their dry ground' - what planet has he been on I wonder? Our field which was beginning to dry out (the joys of heavy clay soil) is getting another drenching today.
Catriona - I sent you another booking form for summer camp but still haven't heard back from you, I wonder if you are receiving them. Can you email me direct (liz@receptional.com) so we can get everything sorted out?
I've been riding Milo, once the snow, driving rain and bitter winds eased, and we're beginning to make progress on finding his missing brakes - this is both useful and reassuring!
Interesting about the different success rates of your two 18yo cows I guess that's a good reason to get so many in calf!
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xx Re: Back to Highlands
« Reply #5 on: Apr 17th, 2013, 4:14pm »

Am writing this in bed- laid low with a sickness bug!
Although the grass has greened up, there still isnt enough to set animals out fulltime.
We had a foot trimmer for the cows - every one was done , as they are on soft bedding all winter. The equipment is rather different to doing a horse. Each cow is put in a crush, slightly squeezed so they stay still,then the crush tips over 90 degrees[ at which point poor cows think they are going to die] then ropes are placed around each fetlock, they have feet pared , then a mechanical sander takes extra horn off. Doesnt take long. Then cow and crush are rotated again,stood upright and walks out - man said ours were the quietest herd he d ever done. I guess even dairy herds are handled much less these days , as 1 man will look after 100 these days.
I sold a stallion roller via 'Horse gossip' last week, but still have a few things to go. main one is an extra wide synthetic - barely used. Moneys gained to go to a hospice - so be generous!
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