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 veryhotthread  Author  Topic: Summer Camp 2010  (Read 9737 times)
taildragger
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #105 on: Apr 26th, 2010, 08:36am »

Judith. You seem to be a tad familiar with regard to chaps and dolls. Tell me, just how many blow up dolls are there knocking around your house then...?! This worried me, so after a perfunctory search, the only find here was a new a rather racy pair of knickers. However, on another note altogether, I have thought for some time that Masonic meetings are a guise for 'alternative' carrying-ons and have been keeping a close eye on Himself for some time.

It was wonderful to watch Saturday, and our home-spun protogee blossoming under Charlie's tutilage. All the students had come on so far by the end of the day. It was magic to see the difference. Most of all, Phillipa and the poor coloured 4 year old. She has got the right mindset and life will be amazingly difficult for her, but I do so hope she sticks with her neddy. It was great to see her smile and enjoy those precious trouble-free moments on a calm and peaceful horse.

Personally, I was delighted with my friend's response to the A.T. It was her first time 'under' Judith and she loved the detail and depth. It demonstrated so well the difference I was so keen for her to try. Equally, I tried a demo for the wine-swilling Oak Farm inmates that had turned out to celebrate a jolly good weekend, by walking accross the yard without limping. I nearly managed it, but the pressure of an audience was too much. Exhaustion, wine and a lack of tea all took their toll. I have however practiced it at home and can get it back. Walking pain-free is some kind of miracle. Believe me. Do you practice the dark arts per chance, Judith? Anyway. I really do appreciate what you have done for me.

I am fully aware that I am slow to lighen my instructions to my horse on ground skills. Refinement I find easier in the saddle. It is something I look for all the time when not under pressure, and am so quick to give. This is far from the case on the ground. The whole of Sunday was given over to altering my gross motor skills into something far less obvious that my horse responded to with his unfailing good nature. This is exactly what I needed and what I was given by Charlie.

My ignorance apalls me sometimes. I have an anxious and underconfident horse, I had thought that by allowing him to knock ground poles with his feet would teach him to place his feet more carefully. I had clocked that this made him anxious (he breathes audibly to let me know) but put this down to trying to hurry ( rolleyes
Not so. The act of knocking the poles was making him anxious and adding to his underconfidence. Poor old boy. We had a quiet moment in the field last night and I promised him that I would try and listen more carefully from hereonin.

All in all, it was probably the best Team Wilson clinic I have ever had in terms of learned lessons and refining new skills. So thanks a million from me, and a very large thanks also to Liz for organising yet another highly enjoyable weekend for our entertainment. Oh yes, it is no good whatsoever heaping on the praise without making ones complaints heard. It is no good Charlie. When you reach 60 you NEED FREQUENT TEA BREAKS. Us old farts need hydrating at regular intervals and one cup of tea in the middle of the day is just not good enough! grin

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Judith
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #106 on: Apr 27th, 2010, 1:59pm »

Thank you , taildragger, and I do hope that your knee continues to be ok. Keep ythinking of soft sternun, crown of head, soles of feet! You ll have to let us know whether the op takes place and how it all goes. I too felt it was a good clinic. Re tea breaks - they would eat into the teaching time , unless we have a char waller to dole out sustenance during the day? We try and pack in as amuch as poss, so you ll have lots to work on when we re not there!
I dont think I use dark arts [ otherwise I d utilise them to lose weight....]. Perhpas next time we could try A T Running ?I m still no runner but at least can go a few hundred yards without falling in a heap. Its all technique!
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taildragger
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #107 on: Apr 28th, 2010, 05:36am »

Seen the surgeon. I'm having an arthroscopy to clear two anterial hooks and debris under the kneecap. He also said that there is not much cartilage left, so they will assess what it to be done about that at the same time. Now I wait for the letter telling me when...

As for the walking, I have changed my boots for trainers (very fetching) and find it much easier to place my feet. I have been practicing every moment I can and have 'found' the place again. I am now known about the place as 'creeping jesus'. Charming.

Hope you have both settled down to life in Yorkshire again after the excitement of the weekend, and that the weather is as beautiful as it is here. Carol and I went for a ride last night and verbally acknowledged how exceptionally lucky we were to have horses and be able to enjoy the freedom of being able to wander amdist such spectacular and beatiful countryside in the sunshine.
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Liz
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #108 on: Apr 30th, 2010, 12:38pm »

I was asked at Shuttleowrth who's coming to the summer camp this year and I struggled to remember all the names, so here's the list:

Carole L
Moya
Alex
Heather
Ann
Sian
amanda
Lili

We're still two down so if you want to join the fun, or know anyone who might like to come please let me know.

Judith (mainly) and me (a bit) are endeavouring to get some lunch time and evening activities organised - any volunteers from anyone (whether you're participating or not on the camp) to come and share your knowledge? Vanessa, you mentioned a while ago that your (equine) dentist would be happy to come and talk to us - can you check if he's still up for that, or give me his details so I can liaise?

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Judith
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #109 on: Apr 30th, 2010, 3:11pm »

Taildragger /creeping jesus; long may it continue! The softer you can walk , the less the cartilage will be worn, and therefore the longer the knee will 'last'. Good luck with the artheroscopy- I m always curious as to what 'debris' consists of!
Re the camp, as its mainly people who have been before we shall have to keep adding a few new 'activities'. I m on the case!

The details of courses and clinics hasnt been updated yet , so here , for any far northeners are directions to Netherton Park[ not Nefferton as written ]
On the A 1 approx 7 miles north of Newcastle near Stannington Village. Take brown sign To Netherton Park. Down to roundabout, right turn under A!, left turn,right then right past house on a corner, pass a weighbridge and straight on.
Charlie is teaching tomorrow [ not sure about myself, but have a plan to visit old pal if I m not needed!]
On Sunday there are various demos , and then we are giving lessons afterwards.
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Judith
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #110 on: May 3rd, 2010, 08:12am »

Back from the cold north [ but our 'north' is just as cold!], many thanks to all we met and taught. One horse had a very interesting history, which showed up the racing USA industry. Apparently, as YEARLINGS they race over a furlong to see their potential. This means they are backed, girthed, fittened before that time! Needless to say , this lovely horse then had physical problems - kissing spines near the wither so bad the 5 spinal processes had their tops shaved off and ligaments sewed back on......six years later and many saddles later he is ridden fine , but what a shame.

I m not a gadget fan , but have discoverd 'Furminators'. They are like a very close /short teethed curry comb, developed for long haired dogs and cats. They take out old winter hair on horses a treat, and bought myself 2 on ebay! I was even able to comb Cartman without objections, which I have never been able to do before!
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alex
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #111 on: May 8th, 2010, 07:02am »

I am trying out the nasal spray Nostril-vet, It works out as 50p a puff - a 1 a ride but it does seem to be helping against the dreaded rape. smiley

I have had 2 hacks out on Duke very short and at the moment in walk on the roads round the edge of the village.
First was horrid and we were raced by a herd of charging bullocks along a field fence - not pleasant but we did survive. Next time he was lovely and is so solid with the traffic - milk floats, pallet lorries, tractors are no worries

Tilly is still a bit bruised from the gate incident and very stroppy as she is still in season. I have a saddle fitting next Thursday and really hope they have something to fit as she needs to be out and about. angry
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Judith
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #112 on: May 9th, 2010, 08:08am »

I hope the spray does the trick. Oilseed rape seems to affect many horses. We had a 'classic' haedshaker , thanks to our many trees. Living now on a fen type area, he never has any symptoms. [Although, after a couple of years after first diagnosis he coped with the pollen better than he had , so I think they can learn to tolerate the thing that seys symptoms off , given a few years]
The 3 visiting natives all leave this weekend , giving us 2 weeks to transform our 2 youngsters ready for the Sports horse sale at Malvern. Auction is not our prefered means of selling, but on previous occasions our yooungsters have happened upon very good homes. We still in touch with some of the horses sold this way, so in reality they have fared no worse than privately sold. And in some circumstances ,better!
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Vanessa
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #113 on: May 18th, 2010, 09:35am »

How's the transformation of the 2 youngsters gone? I'm assuming the sale is not too far away now? I'm sure they will be fine and I'm sure someone will recognise their potential and great behaviour - they've had such a fabulous start in life.
I had a breakthrough on sunday - I was riding S in the school and concentrating very hard on him - living in the moment - focussing where every bit of me was (including my seat bones Judith visualising the position on the saddle horse at Sinnington!) and I got the 'feel' of where every one of his feet were. Such a brilliant feeling! It's taken me 3 years to get to this point but was well worth the wait! grin Also I was so thrilled with him as he's not been ridden virtually the whole winter, apart from a couple of weeks in April (when we had a spell of fine weather!) and he was his usual stubborn self then. However on sunday, I only did a small intro on line from the ground and then just got on him and we just walked, practising lots of changes of rein, circles and halts/starts plus a lovely rein back. We finished our session on a good note and when I dismounted he followed me across the school totally in tune - heaven!! Now I want to recreate that all the time! My inner ballerina was definitely present!! cheesy
Have you ever known horses in a domestic herd stop a fight? About a 8 weeks ago, a new gelding was introduced to the herd and he had been cut late and consequently was quite rough in his play. After about a week, he and his preferred play mate's game got out of hand when one of them obviously nipped too hard - they started properly fighting, slamming kicks etc. Within a few seconds S and another horse ( a quiet boy who keeps himself to himself mostly) had walked over and carefully diverted the fighters - peeling them away 1:1 , like ' cow cutting' horses would and circling round to keep them apart. It just looked like 2 policemen had intervened! Once the fighters were calm they all wandered off. It all happened very quickly and I couldn't believe my eyes, having never seen anything like it before - I wasn't the only person to witness this and the other lady just turned to me and said 'did that really happen?' She now calls S - PC S!!! He still remains no PC Plod however!!
I am so disappointed that I won't be coming to summer camp but I hope to get to Sinnington in Aug (I will e mail you direct Judith) but I'm sure you'll all have a wonderful week. I'll also e mail Liz with my equine dentist's details if you haven't yet arranged all the 'extra curricular' activities (good to tell I'm working in schools!).
My grandaughter has her op this thurs - finally. It's been a horrendous rollercoaster ride - with abnormal blood tests, concerns about her growth, particularly her head and endless trips to hospitals. We are all relieved that the op can finally go ahead and there has been a suggested diagnosis that she was born with laxity in all her ligaments which will improve with age. I'm just keeping my fingers crossed that the op is a success and we can get her on the road to 'normality'. Life has certainly been tough for this little lady but we all eager to get the op over and done with.
The weather has finally improved so I guess we'll all be spending more time outdoors with our horses and less on our computers! I for one intend to enjoy the time - whilst it lasts!
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Judith
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #114 on: May 21st, 2010, 07:46am »

I m sure, Vanessa, we all hope the op goes well and that your granddaughter recovers well. What a worry- all best wishes.
The firs tof the 4 young horses left 2 days ago - he s on loan to firends in Rosedale [ Pebbles, this is] and we re hoping a summer ridden round Rosedale will complete his education. He got a fright when we unloaded him , as rare breed hens are bred as this farm - dozens of them were scratting around - he d never seen such things!
The 2 youngster s for the sports horse sale are trying to sabatage themselves. Foxy keeps rubbing his mane out by trying to eat the haylage furthest from th barriers. But his manners are good now , and leads etc very well. I even 'big balled' him and he wasnt too bad! The yearling is so big- over 16hh already. Obviously she cant be circled etc , and she is led out in hand for walks. Foxy is led off Ben.
Ben is very like Strider in that he will stop a fight if neccessary. I believe its the 'top' horses maintaining discipline in the herd , they need to do this as a delinquent will put the whole herd in danger from predators. Its a fascinating thing , to see how much play fighting is tolerated , but once the line is crossed the bosses do their job . Any unsocialised horse would be sent forever from the herd and left to the lions! We once had a yearling on livery who had been hand reared - she didnt do the mouthing thing to our mares , and they chased her fast and hard for ages [ you can imagine what the owners were thinking watching that!!and it was too fast and furious to try and seperate them ] Then she suddenly did the mouthing thing , and all was peaceful! Its a shame you hadnt got a video camera to catch your boys doing their stuff!
Having sold some of last years calves in April , the new owner set them outside a week ago. The 3 of them chose to crash through a hedge onto the A170 , and go another mile through fields until they came to rest in someones best hayfield. Only 1 has been enticed into a pen and removed - the other 2 remain wild and free up tt their knees in grass!
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #115 on: May 23rd, 2010, 09:37am »

Charlie did a demo in co Durham , Fri eve, followed by lessons all day in the boiling heat yesterday! Many many thanks to Pam who organised this , and Charlie is looking forward to giving follow up lessons there. This morning we have been working the youngsters , C takes them to Malvern tomorrow . They lead ,tie up, trot up, load , be bathed ok now , so although its always sad to see them go , I hope they do well at their new homes .
The first of 7 [!] visiting horses comes this evening - , and although they arent to be ridden daily , it ll still keep us busy for the next few weeks.
Is everone out there riding/showing/jumping/trecing ??Let us know how you re all doing!
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #116 on: May 23rd, 2010, 11:49am »

Vanessa. I do so hope that all is well with that small grand child of yours. We will miss you dreadfully at camp but at least your time with us is being sacrificed for a better job. I trust you have told them what their newest employee is givng up, just for them? Anyway, onwards and upwards.

How sad it is to see youngstock go to the sales, but at least this way they stand half a chance of seeing life and serving some useful function. It must be hard though. I wonder, if it is any harder parting with the cows or the horses?

I have been watching the descriptions of horses behaving in certain ways with interest. My bedroom overlooks the Home Grove Trekherner stud's fields, and I spend ages watching the youngsters play, fight and rocket about. It helps that they are one of the more attractive breeds, and the new babies are just the most adorable things ever. I would have loved to have had the oportunity of having a foal to touch, look at and bring on. This must the ultimate buzz for a horsy bod - to see your own little ned grow up to be a sane and sensible member of the equine race.

We have Boxed over to Carole L's a few times to hack out. First shows and stressage comp next month. Went for a hack night before last with Carol R, Tanya and myself. Left the yard at 6pm, rode to Ickwell Cricket Club where we got off and had a few drinks. It was wonderful to have such beautifully behaved horses.
They just put their heads down and munched whist we fended off the hoards of children and visitors.

It was not until I attempted to mount that I discovered that I had probably had one brandy too much. We were helpless with laughter which made further attampts almost impossible. Once underway I got everyone doing Qi Gong -so no reins and lots of hand waving had astonished passing motorists doubled up.
We plan another such outing soon - but this time we are going to be more careful with the intake. It was such fun though.

What wasnt fun (and I was the only person to think so) was the 7 continental stallions we went to see yesterday. Carol and I were invited to a private 'showing' and I am aware that many people would have died for the privilage, but I have to say that it left me unsettled. The horses stabled 24/7, performing at events, no much hacking and no turnout for most. This clouded my enjoyment of watching a Grand Prix dressage rider doing astonishingly athletic things with his beautiful neds. I wasnt even blown away by the performances of which we watched 3.
I briefly had extended trot-envy, but that is all. I watched these hugely crested beasts rolled up (but with vertical faces), shortened, making grunting noises (perhaps all stallions do?) and felt nothing but pity.

We were welcomed, given as much hospitality as it is possible to imagine and were treated like royalty, but still I left feeling that I wish I hadnt gone at all. I have been told that my attiude is way over the top, and that it is just the way it is and if we want to see these horses perform at this level then that is what I will have to accept. This is probably absolutely right. But it still has not changed the way I feel about it.

As always on a Sunday I hack out round the village with Tanya (The village Loop) we leave the yard at 0800 on the dot. We had a lovely ride in this glorious sunshine. It was so hot, the Horses did not even want to trot and when they did, I only had to breathe out and H came to a grinding halt.

The great thing about riding large horses in a village with little thatched cottages is that one can see people inside their bedrooms at head height. This morning we gave one chap a hell of a fright by bidding him a 'good morning' whilst he was enjoying a qiet read. It made us laugh all the way home. Good job he was not holding a cup of tea too!

I hope everyone else is having such a good time in this brilliant weather.


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alex
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #117 on: May 26th, 2010, 11:03am »

Lovely to hear from Vanessa. As she knows we are thinking of her and her family and hope all is going well.

Taildragger, I know of the horses of which you speak. Judith, they are the ones in those photos at the yard BTW. Their head ,neck, back ratio is all wrong but the owner has taught himself and has no formal qualifications. He is a Lusitano show judge and so many are now over bent in that they are pulled in but their faces are flat.

Gary and I are going to the Lusitano fair in Portugal this November and I am sure I will see all types of riding and training but I am already practising deep breathing and relaxation

lipsrsealed

I am going on quiet hacks accompanied by a staff member all at walk. On Monday we went on our first full ride through the village around the fields and back making a loop. We have taken him round the cul-de-sac a few times and then up to the church and back to make sure he was safe and sound. Monday took him off road and past lots of new things. He was better than the school master we were following grin

Traffic does not bother him. He waits nicely at the junctions even if the lead horse frets. He will start or fix on something but can be brought back quickly. The herd of charging bullocks has been our worst incident to date.
A large bull on its own was no problem.

My tasks are to get him used to riding along side the other horse , to ride in front and to be able to open gates. I know these things are going to take a while but I can see they are also part of the bigger picture with him. Now he wants to hack out all the time and if its not convenient he will invite you to go on a hack first, then he tries to take you to the mounting block and invites you to get off, then he stamps his feet! After that he gets on with what is asked. Complete Kevin!

He was fantastic in George's school video the other evening: allowing G and a friend to ride him and then falling off to illustrate that accidents in rural areas are far from hospitals. G enjoyed it so much he wants to take up riding again this summer. Maybe it was his project partner liking riding ; she is a rather pretty girl...
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Judith
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #118 on: May 26th, 2010, 3:19pm »

I havent spoken to Vanessa, but her firend , who has left her Iberian horses with us , says granddaughter is doing well. So thats good news.
I think high powered dressage is my pet hate , the lack of a natural life ie turn out , rides out, rides on a loose rein , are unknown to these horses. And not just competition dressage here and 'usual suspects' countries. Apparently if you went to the classical Portugese school/Spanish schools this is what you d find there also. The Iberian horses are bred for 'nobility' , and as Lucy Rees pointed out to us , that implies being able to deal with suffering. [ Lucy Rees has written books on horsemanship, and lived in Spain, often dealing with the consequences of serrata nosebands]
It also has to be said the Iberian horses are naturally set on their hocks and shorten their necks and 'hold' themslves when ridden- the 1 Luso that is here is no exception. We are trying to bend and soften him

C returned with the bay yearling , as their was no decent bid for her. She has learned to travel well - early on ,say 15 miles or so,she headbutted the lorry window out completely, and it took 2 hours before the pair of them stood still. Its one reason why we actually like a first travelling to be long - they eventually go into a quiet stupor!
Foxy has gone to a lovely permenant home, so thats good. Taildragger asks if I miss the cattle or horses more when they go - its about the same. We try to handle calves least, so that they are not 'personalities', knowing they ll be going to a fatting farm from here. If we get to know them , or worse give them a name , then they are always remembered . Likewise, we d prefer to sell youngsters as foals, so that they leave before we re too attached. Does nt always happen!
I love your boozy ride, taildragger , thats what its all about. Also glad , Alex that things going well at your end with Duke.Hacking out will do him a world of good. Ben also will make for the mounting block if I sit on him for any time in the yard - his hint to tell me to get off ! He was pleased today he didnt have to lead off . C rode the Luso, and we had an event free ride. We still have 2 laminitic ox rest ponies here , 1 getting much better , the other not really. She is quite aged , and perhaps lacking the robustness to get better. So, with those 2 in, others in during day or night , plus 2 cows and Rocky [ he has had a 'breeding strain' according to our greek vet ie too much vigourous sex!!] there is plenty to keep us busy in the shed.
BTW, our email is playing up , so we may be unable to communicate directly with forum members for a short while
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xx Re: Summer Camp 2010
« Reply #119 on: May 28th, 2010, 08:03am »

I forgot to answer the grunting question.
C just remarked yesterday that Inca, like her dad grunts when she relaxes - just the once. I think it ll be when the diaphragm lets the tension go.
If horses grunt each time they are 'kicked' , it can be a sign of stomach ulcers. I suppose it could be sign of other discomforts too. There are lots of supplements now for stomach ulcers , yet the only medicine needed is turn out and ad lib forage.......
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